http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Identifying high risk loading conditions for in-season injury in elite Australian football players http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/vital:13261 1, p < 0.05) for injury within 7 days. Most (93%) of these conditions occurred when chronic load was low or very low and ACWR was either low (<0.6) or high (>1.5). Once a high injury risk condition was entered, the elevated risk persisted for up to 28 days. Conclusions Injury risk was greatest when chronic load was low and ACWR was either low or high. This heightened risk remained for up to 4 weeks. There was no improvement in the ability to identify high injury risk situations by altering acute or chronic time periods from 1:4 weeks.]]> Tue 04 Sep 2018 09:53:49 AEST ]]> Multivariate modelling of subjective and objective monitoring data improve the detection of non-contact injury risk in elite Australian footballers http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Repository/vital:13207 9 years) (multivariate adj- IRR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.03–4.06) was also associated with increased injury risk, but screening data were not. Predictive capacity of multivariate models was significantly better than univariate (AUCmultivariate = 0.70, 95% CI 0.64–0.75; AUCunivariate range = 0.51–0.60). Conclusions: Chronic load is an important moderating factor in the workload–injury relationship. Low chronic loads coupled with low or very high ACWR are associated with increased injury risk.]]> Thu 16 Aug 2018 13:28:42 AEST ]]>