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Date: 2017
Type: Text
Identifier: http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/158533
Description: In this review, we summarize the latest evidence demonstrating that the shape and feel of the glassware (and other receptacles) that we drink from can influence our perception of the taste/flavour of ... More
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Date: 2016
Type: Text
Identifier: http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/157478
Description: While the role of the horse in riding hazards is well recognised, little attention has been paid to the role of specific theoretical psychological processes of humans in contributing to and mitigating... More
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Reviewed: Reviewed
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Date: 2012
Type: Text
Identifier: http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/157432
Description: In four experiments, blindfolded participants were presented with pairs of stimuli simultaneously, one to each index finger. Participants moved one index finger, which was presented with cutaneous and... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2003
Type: Text
Identifier: http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/41183
Description: The study examined whether the magnitude of same-sex-favouring implicit gender bias depends on individual differences in self-esteem and gender identity as theorized by Greenwald et al. The Implicit A... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2003
Type: Text
Identifier: http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/33822
Description: This article is based on aproject aimed at generating practicalsuggestions based on research findings abouthow new technologies might be used to enhanceL1 literacy attainment in disadvantagedsettings.... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
Date: 2001
Type: Text
Identifier: http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/33901
Description: Three experiments are reported demonstrating that levels of penile tumescence and subjective sexual arousal are greater when men employ participant-oriented rather than spectator-oriented attentional ... More
Reviewed: Reviewed
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